$200 Consignment Fee · 8% Commission · No Pass Out Fee · Soft Close · National Advertising
Optional: Robin Glenn Pedigree and Individual Advertising!

New horses/ponies listed on Wednesday evening with 4 days of preview before bidding opens.  Auctions close on Sunday evenings.  Consignments need to have all required material before being listed.

1.    Request a consignment form to be completed electronically or print and send completed form digitally to sales@cowponysales.com
2.   Send a brief description of the horse/pony including abilities, reserve price, photo and short video to sales@cowponysales.com with completed consignment form.
3.  After approval you need to get all the following submitted by 12pm CST the Tuesday before the sale.

a.    Current Coggins (copy emailed)
b.    Original papers (copy emailed)
c.    Video clearly showing movement and ability (see tips below)
d.    Minimum of 4 HIGH QUALITY photos showing all sides (see tips below)
e.    Signed Terms and Conditions
f.     Signed Fitness and Health Guarantee
g.    Paid consignment fee (PayPal, Venmo, Check or Credit Card)

4.    Watch us sell your horse!

a.     Soft Close – Auction is open until no new bids for 4 minutes
b.    We will handle securing funds from the buyer (due 48 hours after auction close).
c.     You get paid within 10 days from completion of payment by the buyer.

 

Video Tips for Sale Horses

High quality video is extremely important when getting top dollar for your horse/pony.  This is not a place to ‘settle’ and is definitely worth your time to get it right.  Follow these tips:

a.     Use a HIGH quality camera or cell phone
b.     Keep each clip 3 minutes or less to keep file size small enough to send
c.     Make sure to hold the phone or camera HORIZONTALLY – not vertically
d.     Send RAW, unedited, video clips to edit and use in promotions
e.     Do not add music, text, graphics, etc to video clips

 

Photo tips for sale horses

Selling your horse online requires you to provide high quality photos that showcase the best parts of your horse.  The photos you provide will be the first impression people get of your horse, and first impressions matter.  Photos are worth the investment to hire a professional if at all possible.  If there is not a professional available, you can achieve quality photos with a standard smart phone camera.  As experts in online horse sales, we have experienced firsthand the difference in sale prices based off of photos alone.  Below are our top 10 tips for getting top dollar for your horse, through photos.

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Don't rush it.
Sounds simple enough, but really. Give yourself 1-2 hours to take the photos. Don’t think you’ll accomplish it ‘real quick’. You do not want to get frustrated or rushed during the process or you will not get the quality photos needed.
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Ask for help.
You will not accomplish this alone. We recommend 2 helpers to be efficient and time effective. You’ll need 1 person to operate the camera (high quality phone camera is fine), 1 person to set the horse up and 1 person to get the horse’s attention and be a ‘runner’.
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Time of day – Part 1
It’s important to have proper, natural lighting to achieve the best color and the least amount of shadows. Whenever possible, outdoor photos are best. An overcast day is better than a sunny day. So, what TIME of day is best?
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Time of day – Part 2
Ideally 1-2 hours before sunset. If that is not possible, make sure when you’re taking photos you have the sun behind the camera and be mindful of the shadows. Daytime photos often give a harsh view of the topline and can cast odd shadows on the body.
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Grooming – Part 1
It goes without saying, a clean horse will photograph better than a dirty one. This is a place you do NOT want to skimp.
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Grooming – Part 2
Give him a bath, clip up his face, brush out the mane/tail. It’s important to have hooves trimmed so as not to distract from confirmation of the animal. Before starting photos, the horse should be completely dry.
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Equipment.
This is often overlooked and it is one of the most important details. Horses should have a clean, proper fitting, halter or bridle. The halter and lead rope should not stand out – meaning a darker colored horse should wear a darker colored halter. A lighter colored horse should wear a lighter (or leather) colored halter. AVOID bright colors and patterns. Make sure the halter fits snuggly to show proper head shape. An ill-fitting halter can give the appearance of a poor sized head and neck. When photographing with a saddle, it should be clean with a saddle pad that coordinates with the horse's color. Again, avoid bright colors.
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Background.
What is in the photo with the horse MATTERS. Make sure you scout out an area that has limited distractions. A landscape background or solid background is best. There should NOT be a building, another animal, a vehicle, a human, a bucket, a mailbox, power poles, etc.
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Fill the Frame.
When you take your photos, the horse should be the majority of the frame. Yes, some cropping can be done. However, you’ll receive better quality photos and avoid the ‘grainy’ look if minimal cropping is done. To achieve this, move closer to the horse, when possible, verses using the zoom on your camera.
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Setting up the horse – Part 1
This is EXTEMELY important and where it is helpful to have an experienced handler. You want the horse to appear natural, yet structured. All four feet should be on the ground (no resting) and visible. Ears should be forward for all photos. Neck should be at its natural rise, not overly raised/arched and not stretched out low.
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Setting up the horse – Part 2
This will be the most time-consuming part – and worth every minute to do it correctly! For every 10 photos you take, 1 will be good. Just keep taking them and review them later.
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The angle matters
You’ll want to shoot your photos from the horse’s level. If necessary, you may need to kneel to get the right height. Stand mid-barrel and adjust accordingly. Shooting too high can make your horse look smaller and short legged. When doing headshots, you’ll want to be at eye level. Straight on shots of the head are not preferred.
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Be patient
Don’t stress about the perfect shot, just keep shooting! The more you can plan and prepare, the smoother it will go. Make sure you’ve given yourself time and have gathered all the tools and accessories you’ll need ahead of time.
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Bonus Tips

1. Action photos that grab the buyer's attention. They should be clear and again avoid distractions.
2. Getting horses ears up can be a challenge! What works great is having your 3rd helper (the runner) have horse sounds pulled up on their phone. When you play that, your horse will perk his ears!
3. Lowering the head can be done by using a stick, broom or plastic across the ground in front of them.
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